100 Years exactly since the reading of the 1916 Proclamation – and now in Irish Sign Language


1916 Proclamation in Irish Sign Language on YouTube with optional subtitles

1916 Proclamation in Irish Sign Language on YouTube with subtitles

Download the 1916 Proclamation text here


While the centenary commemoration of the 1916 Proclamation was marked on Easter Monday 28th March this year, the actual reading of the  1916 Proclamation was on 24th April 1916, shortly after noon. Today is a day to be celebrated in Ireland.

The Ireland 2016 Centenary Programme commissioned Interesource Group to produce the translated video to ensure that alongside the reading of the 1916 Proclamation which guarantees “equal rights and equal opportunities to all its citizens” that the Irish Sign Language using community would have full access to the 1916 Proclamation in their own language. This facilitates full participation of Deaf citizens on what will be an historic day. This is extremely important as Deaf citizens are continually excluded from daily participation in all walks of life, and this impinges on the opportunity to engage as full citizens. One of the reasons for this is the fact that ISL is not legally recognised or protected in Ireland as an official language of the State, a fact that increasingly marks us out from our European and International counterparts.

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The Launch of the Official 1916 Proclamation in Irish Sign Language


1916 Proclamation in Irish Sign Language on YouTube with optional subtitles

1916 Proclamation in Irish Sign Language on YouTube with subtitles

Download the 1916 Proclamation text here


The Irish Deaf Society, the Centre for Deaf Studies at Trinity College Dublin and Interesource Group (Ireland) Limited work closely on many educational projects and for the 1916 Proclamation Translation project, we convened a small team of translators and interpreters to work on the translation, filming and production of the text. Because Irish Sign Language has no written form, the digital version is a de facto translation: like written translations, it is highly prepared and each element is considered in terms of formality, context, meaning and political resonance. The visual quality of the translator signing has to be crisp and clear – to do otherwise renders the translation ‘inaudible’ for an audience for whom visual access is key. And access to this key historical text is the primary goal of this work.

The Ireland 2016 Centenary Programme commissioned Interesource Group to produce the translated video to ensure that alongside the reading of the 1916 Proclamation which guarantees “equal rights and equal opportunities to all its citizens” that the Irish Sign Language using community would have full access to the 1916 Proclamation in their own language. This facilitates full participation of Deaf citizens on what will be an historic day. This is extremely important as Deaf citizens are continually excluded from daily participation in all walks of life, and this impinges on the opportunity to engage as full citizens. One of the reasons for this is the fact that ISL is not legally recognised or protected in Ireland as an official language of the State, a fact that increasingly marks us out from our European and International counterparts.

Today, the Provost of Trinity College Dublin, Professor Patrick Prendergast, launched a collection of 17 translations of the 1916 Proclamation in the languages taught at the College which includes Irish Sign Language.  The translation of the Official 1916 Proclamation in ISL translation as seen here will also be available on websites across the country.

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JUSTISIGNS – Interpreters working with victims of sexual abuse – Masterclass with the Dublin Rape Crisis Centre

Interpreters working with victims of sexual abuse – masterclass with the Dublin Rape Crisis Centre

Interesource Group (Ireland) Limited and the Centre for Deaf Studies, Trinity College Dublin are delighted to be collaborating with the Dublin Rape Crisis Centre who will host this 2-day training session as part of the JUSTISIGNS project masterclass series. The Dublin Rape Crisis Centre has since 1979 offered a wide range of services to women and men who are affected by rape, sexual assault, sexual harassment or childhood sexual abuse. The Education and Training Department of DRCC provides training programmes for professionals and volunteers who provide support or services to victims of sexual violence.

This training programme is designed to prepare deaf and hearing interpreters to work with victims of sexual violence including in their interaction with the legal process. It provides an opportunity to consider the beliefs that exist in society in relation to sexual violence and how they are internalised by and impact upon the victim. Participants will learn about the impact of childhood abuse and of rape and sexual assault. The legal process and its impact on the victim who reports is explored, and issues which arise for the interpreter. The principles and ethics of interpreting are considered in relation to working within this context. Some guidelines are provided regarding interpreting in a counselling situation.

The training approach is participative and experiential. Methods used include group discussion, lecture, case studies, videos, and experiential exercises. The training approach is invitational, with the sensitive nature of the issues being covered and the fact that they may resonate for participants acknowledged. Participation is encouraged but without pressure. There is a strong focus on the impact on the interpreter of working with these issues, the potential for vicarious traumatisation, and strategies the interpreter can employ for self care.

The training programme will be delivered by Leonie O’Dowd, Head of Education and Training and Jane Baird, Education Executive of the Dublin Rape Crisis Centre Education and Training Department.  DRCC develops and delivers tailored training programmes for those providing services and supports to people who have experienced childhood sexual abuse and sexual violence.  DRCC has provided training programmes for ISL interpreters in the past, and has published a Handbook for community interpreters ‘Interpreting in Situations of Sexual Violence and other Trauma’.  Leonie has worked with DRCC for 16 years and is an accredited  psychotherapist with specialist training in the treatment of trauma.  Jane has worked with DRCC for 7 years.  She is also an accredited psychotherapist, and has considerable experience of working and training in the area of disability.

To book please visit:  justisignsdrcc.eventbrite.ie  PLACES ARE LIMITED For any queries please contact Haaris on 087 2270311 or email: info@justisigns.com